19 July 2005

This world is messed up.

I was going to write about the Q and Not U show at Fort Reno last night (oh yeah and the first band, Son of Nun, were damn good -- and they threw out a little go-go tinged hip hop at the very end of their set), but then I picked up the paper this morning and saw on the front page a story that made me cry.

I'm pretty cynical about a lot of things. I keep my distance emotionally from a lot of idiocy in this world, such as the Bush regime policies. Sure, I rail against them, but I have an understanding of evil that allows me to rationalize why Bush tramples the Constitution and works to undo nearly every strand of our social contract, while at the same time causing death and suffering overseas. That's all large scale and in a way abstract. But I cannot ever rationalize or come close to understanding the direct, personal harm done to children. This particular crime seems utterly barbaric.

I am staunchly anti-capital punishment, so death penalty is out, but life without any chance whatsoever of parole and extremely limited visitation rights would satisfy me. People who hurt or kill children simply need to be gone permanently from society.

Maybe I'll write about the Fort Reno show later. Right now I'm too pissed off and torn up to think about it.

2 comments:

cupcakegrrl said...

i agree with everything you say- although i qualify that i haven't seen all the tv shoes you mention.

i am curious. did you say you have children? before you had them, were you as conscious of crimes committed to them? that's an academic question. i like the thought of children in general, and there are children who i love. i am angered by crimes against children, as i am angered against crimes against anyone. i am wondering if having them takes it up a notch. i would think that it would, making a hit and run incident involving a child more abstractly painful than one involving an older person.

your thoughts?

cuff said...

Definitely having kids of my own made me more sensitive to crimes against kids. Kids change a lot of perspective.